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Yat is associated with the working and lower middle classes, though a spectrum with fewer notable Yat features is often heard the higher one's socioeconomic status; such New Orleans affluence is associated with the New Orleans Uptown and the Garden District, and its speech patterns are sometimes considered a separate variety altogether from the Yat dialect.Prior to becoming a phonologically unified dialect region, the South was once home to an array of much more diverse accents at the local level.The Savannah accent is also becoming more Midland-like.The following vowel sounds of Atlanta, Charleston, and Savannah have been unaffected by typical Southern phenomena like the Southern drawl and Southern Vowel Shift: Southern Louisiana, as well as some of southeast Texas (Houston to Beaumont), and coastal Mississippi, feature a number of dialects influenced by other languages beyond English.In the purple areas, the merger is complete for most speakers.Note the exclusion of the New Orleans area, Southern Florida, and of the Lowcountry of South Carolina and Georgia.This linguistic region includes Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana, and Arkansas, as well as most of Texas, Virginia, Kentucky, Oklahoma, West Virginia, and northern and central Florida.

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The South proper as a present-day dialect region generally includes all of these pronunciation features below, which are popularly recognized in the United States as a "Southern accent".

Southern American English as a regional dialect can be divided into various sub-dialects, the most phonologically advanced (i.e., the most recently shifted) ones being southern varieties of Appalachian English and certain varieties of Texan English.

African-American English has many common points with Southern American English dialects due to the strong historical ties of African Americans to the South.

Most of southern Louisiana constitutes Acadiana, dominated for hundreds of years by monolingual speakers of Cajun French, which combines elements of Acadian French with other French and Spanish words.

This French dialect is spoken by many of the older members of the Cajun ethnic group and is said to be dying out.

Since the early 1900s, Cajuns of southern Louisiana, though historically monolingual French speakers, began to develop their own vernacular dialect of English, which retains some influences and words from Acadian/Cajun French, such as "cher" (dear) or "nonc" (uncle).

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